Books for International Day of Women and Girls in Science

By Coll Rowe | February 10 2022 | Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

The International Day of Women and Girls in Science celebrated on 11 February, is implemented by UNESCO and UN-Women, in collaboration institutions and civil society partners that aim to promote women and girls in science. This Day is an opportunity to promote full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls. Gender equality is a global priority for UNESCO, and the support of young girls, their education and their full ability to make their ideas heard are levers for development and peace. Tackling some of the greatest challenges of the Agenda for Sustainable Development—from improving health to combating climate change—will rely on harnessing all talent. That means getting more women working in these fields. Diversity in research expands the pool of talented researchers, bringing in fresh perspectives, talent and creativity. This Day is a reminder that women and girls play a critical role in science and technology communities and that their participation should be strengthened. We join in to celebrate #WomeninScience on #February11 with the international science community.

 

Here are some highlights from the books published by the imprints of Penguin Random House written by, and also celebrating, women in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math:

 

Lab Girl

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography, Lab Girl is Hope Jahren’s revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also a celebration of the lifelong curiosity, humility, and passion that drive every scientist.

 

Broad Band 

In a world where women are often dissuaded from STEM careers, Broad Band shines a light on the bright minds history forgot, from pioneering database poets, data wranglers, and hypertext dreamers to glass ceiling-shattering dot com-era entrepreneurs.

 

The Sirens of Mars 

In this beautifully observed book, Georgetown scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson tells the story of how she and other researchers have scoured Mars for signs of life, transforming the planet from a distant point of light into a world of its own.

 

Handprints on Hubble

In Handprints on Hubble, Kathyrn D. Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space, recounts her experience as part of the team that launched, rescued, repaired, and maintained the Hubble Space Telescope.

 

Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage

This graphic novel presents a rollicking alternate reality in which Charles Babbage, the unrealized inventor of the computer, and his accomplice, Ada, Countess of Lovelace, build the Difference Engine, an idea from her original footnotes on Babbage’s plans for an enormous mechanical calculating machine.

 

The Plant Hunter 

In The Plant Hunter, a leading medical ethnobotanist tells us her story in this uplifting and adventure-filled memoir that illuminates how the path forward for medical discovery may be found in nature’s oldest remedies.

 

The Smallest Lights in the Universe

In this luminous memoir, an MIT astrophysicist must reinvent herself in the wake of tragedy and discovers the power of connection on this planet, even as she searches our galaxy for another Earth.

 

The Alchemy of Us 

Scientist and science writer Ainissa Ramirez examines eight inventions—clocks, steel rails, copper communication cables, photographic film, light bulbs, hard disks, scientific labware, and silicon chips—and reveals how they shaped the human experience.

 

The Glass Universe 

Elegantly written and enriched by excerpts from letters, diaries, and memoirs, The Glass Universe is the hidden history of the women whose contributions to the burgeoning field of astronomy forever changed our understanding of the stars and our place in the universe.

 

Headstrong 

Rachel Swaby’s vibrant profiles of 52 women span centuries of courageous thinkers and illustrate how each one’s ideas developed, from their first moment of scientific engagement through the research and discovery for which they’re best known.

 

Finding the Mother Tree

In Finding the Mother Tree, Suzanne Simard, the world’s leading forest ecologist who forever changed how people view trees and their connections to one another, writes about her scientific quest and her own journey of observation and change.


More books on Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics


More books on Women and Technology


 

Lab Girl
A Memoir
978-1-101-87372-4
National Bestseller
$16.00 US
Feb 28, 2017
Paperback
304 Pages
Vintage

Broad Band
The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet
978-0-593-32944-3
If you loved Hidden Figures or The Rise of the Rocket Girls, you'll love Claire Evans' breakthrough book on the women who brought you the internet—written out of history, until now.
$16.00 US
Jul 07, 2020
Paperback
288 Pages
Portfolio

Handprints on Hubble
An Astronaut's Story of Invention
978-0-262-53964-7
The first American woman to walk in space recounts her experience as part of the team that launched, rescued, repaired, and maintained the 30-year-old Hubble Space Telescope.
$17.95 US
Dec 01, 2020
Paperback
304 Pages
The MIT Press

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage
The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer
978-0-307-90827-8
Meet Victorian London’s most dynamic duo: Charles Babbage, the unrealized inventor of the computer, and his accomplice, Ada, Countess of Lovelace, the peculiar protoprogrammer and daughter of Lord Byron. When Lovelace translated a description of Babbage’s plans for an enormous mechanical calculating machine in 1842, she added annotations three times longer than the original work. Her footnotes contained the first appearance of the general computing theory, a hundred years before an actual computer was built. Sadly, Lovelace died of cancer a decade after publishing the paper, and Babbage never built any of his machines.
$40.00 US
Apr 21, 2015
Hardcover
320 Pages
Pantheon

The Sirens of Mars
Searching for Life on Another World
978-1-101-90483-1
"Sarah Stewart Johnson interweaves her own coming-of-age story as a planetary scientist with a vivid history of the exploration of Mars in this celebration of human curiosity, passion, and perseverance."--Alan Lightman, author of Einstein's Dreams"Lovely . . . Johnson's prose swirls with lyrical wonder, as varied and multihued as the apricot deserts, butterscotch skies and blue sunsets of Mars."--Anthony Doerr, The New York Times Book Review
$17.00 US
Jul 20, 2021
Paperback
304 Pages
Crown

The Alchemy of Us
How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another
978-0-262-54226-5
In the bestselling tradition of Stuff Matters and The Disappearing Spoon: a clever and engaging look at materials, the innovations they made possible, and how these technologies changed us. Finalist for the 41st Los Angeles Times Book Award in Science and Technology and selected as one of the Best Summer Science Books Of 2020 by Science Friday. 
$17.95 US
Apr 06, 2021
Paperback
328 Pages
The MIT Press

The Glass Universe
How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars
978-0-14-311134-4
From #1 New York Times bestselling author Dava Sobel, the captivating, little-known true story of women's landmark contributions to astronomy.
$20.00 US
Oct 31, 2017
Paperback
352 Pages
Penguin Books

The Smallest Lights in the Universe
A Memoir
978-0-525-57626-6
"Bewitching." Anthony Doerr, The New York Times Book ReviewIn this luminous memoir, an MIT astrophysicist must reinvent herself in the wake of tragedy and discovers the power of connection on this planet, even as she searches our galaxy for another Earth.
$17.00 US
Aug 03, 2021
Paperback
336 Pages
Crown

Headstrong
52 Women Who Changed Science-and the World
978-0-553-44679-1
Fifty-two inspiring and insightful profiles of history’s brightest female scientists.
$17.00 US
Apr 07, 2015
Paperback
288 Pages
Crown