Books for Indigenous Peoples’ Day

By Luis Diaz | October 11 2021 | General

On October 11th, we celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day to commemorate and honor the history and culture of Native communities. On October 8th, 2021, President Joe Biden signed a presidential proclamation formally recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day as a national holiday:

“For generations, Federal policies systematically sought to assimilate and displace Native people and eradicate Native cultures,” President Biden wrote in the proclamation. “Today, we recognize Indigenous peoples’ resilience and strength as well as the immeasurable positive impact that they have made on every aspect of American society.”

Here are our title recommendations that reframe our understanding of US History and elevate Native voices for Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

 

American Indian Stories

A groundbreaking Lakota author and activist chronicles her refusal to assimilate into 19th century white society and her mission to preserve her culture.

 

1491 (Second Edition)

In this groundbreaking work of science, history, and archaeology, Charles C. Mann radically alters our understanding of the Americas before the arrival of Columbus in 1492.

 

An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States

Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples’ history radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.

 

Yellow Bird

The true crime story of a murder on an Indian reservation, and the unforgettable Arikara woman who becomes obsessed with solving it—an urgent work of literary journalism and social criticism.

 

Blue Dawn, Red Earth

These 30 varied and powerful short stories by Native American storytellers incorporate traditional oral tales into modern narratives. The writers, most of whom are new, featured in this collection represent a wide range of tribes and cultural backgrounds, and demonstrate the vibrancy and diversity of Native American writing.

 

A Mind Spread Out on the Ground

A bold and profound meditation on trauma, legacy, oppression and racism in North America from an award-winning Haudenosaunee writer

 

Dog Flowers

A daughter returns home to the Navajo reservation to confront her family’s troubled history and retrace her mother’s life—using both narrative and archive in this unforgettable and heart-wrenching memoir.

 

There There

Tommy Orange’s shattering novel follows twelve characters from Native communities: all traveling to the Big Oakland Powwow, all connected to each other in ways they may not yet realize.

 

Not “A Nation of Immigrants”

Debunks the pervasive and self-congratulatory myth that our country is proudly founded by and for immigrants, and urges readers to embrace a more complex and honest history of the United States

Not "A Nation of Immigrants"
Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion
978-0-8070-3629-7
Debunks the pervasive and self-congratulatory myth that our country is proudly founded by and for immigrants, and urges readers to embrace a more complex and honest history of the United States  
$27.95 US
Aug 24, 2021
Hardcover
400 Pages
Beacon Press



An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States
978-0-8070-5783-4
Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire.
$16.00 US
Aug 11, 2015
Paperback
320 Pages
Beacon Press

Yellow Bird
Oil, Murder, and a Woman's Search for Justice in Indian Country
978-0-399-58917-1
The true crime story of a murder on an Indian reservation, and the unforgettable Arikara woman who becomes obsessed with solving it--an urgent, page-turning work of literary journalism and social criticism.
$18.00 US
Feb 16, 2021
Paperback
400 Pages
Random House Trade Paperbacks

Blue Dawn, Red Earth
New Native American Storytellers
978-0-385-47952-3
These 30 varied and powerful short stories by Native American storytellers incorporate traditional oral tales into modern narratives. The writers, most of whom are new, featured in this collection represent a wide range of tribes and cultural backgrounds, and demonstrate the vibrancy and diversity of Native American writing. The characters in these stories are as enduring as those that have been passed down in legend, as they capture the spirit of Native America, past and present.
$16.95 US
Jan 01, 1996
Paperback
448 Pages
Anchor


Dog Flowers
A Memoir
978-1-9848-2039-6
A daughter returns home to the Navajo reservation to confront her family's troubled history and retrace her mother's life--using both narrative and archive in this unforgettable and heart-wrenching memoir.
$27.00 US
Jan 12, 2021
Hardcover
272 Pages
One World