The Journey Prize Stories 20

The Best of Canada's New Writers

Author Various
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Paperback
$17.99 US
On sale Oct 28, 2008 | 248 Pages | 978-0-7710-4343-7
“Considering the number of popular and prize-winning writers who have a Journey Prize as part of their resume, it’s no exaggeration to suggest that this volume is the future of Canadian writing. . . . And the future seems bright indeed.” —Robert Wiersema, Ottawa Citizen

The Journey Prize Stories is widely celebrated as the premiere showcase for new writing in Canada, and a virtual who’s who of up-and-coming literary talents. Readers of the anthology have consistently been among the first to discover such now well-known writers as André Alexis, David Bergen, Michael Crummey, Elizabeth Hay, Yann Martel, Lisa Moore, Heather O’Neill, Eden Robinson, Neil Smith, Timothy Taylor, Madeleine Thien, M.G. Vassanji, and Alissa York, among many others. With this twentieth edition, featuring an introduction by the jury and comments from a stellar group of high-profile past contributors, The Journey Prize Stories continues to take the pulse of Canada’s literary scene.

The stories included in the anthology are contenders for the $1,000 Writers’ Trust McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize.
ALEXANDER MACLEOD was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of stories, Light Lifting, was a national bestseller, won an Atlantic Book Award, and was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Thomas Head Raddall Fiction Award, and the Commonwealth Book Prize. His most recent book of fiction, Animal Person, won the Dartmouth Book Award for Fiction, was named a Best Book of the Year by The New Yorker, CBC Books, and the Globe and Mail, and includes stories that were featured in The New Yorker, Granta, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. In 2019, he won an O. Henry Award for his story “Lagomorph.” MacLeod holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill University. He currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

SOUVANKHAM THAMMAVONGSA's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Best American Non-Required Reading, The Journey Prize Stories, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Her debut book of fiction, How to Pronounce Knife, won the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the 2021 Trillium Book Award, and was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN America Open Book Award, the Danuta Gleed Award, and one of Time's Must-Read Books of 2020. Thammavongsa is also the author of four poetry books: Light, winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Found; Small Arguments, winner of the ReLit Award; and, most recently, Cluster. Born in the Lao refugee camp in Nong Khai, Thailand, she was raised and educated in Toronto, where she is at work on her first novel. View titles by Various

About

“Considering the number of popular and prize-winning writers who have a Journey Prize as part of their resume, it’s no exaggeration to suggest that this volume is the future of Canadian writing. . . . And the future seems bright indeed.” —Robert Wiersema, Ottawa Citizen

The Journey Prize Stories is widely celebrated as the premiere showcase for new writing in Canada, and a virtual who’s who of up-and-coming literary talents. Readers of the anthology have consistently been among the first to discover such now well-known writers as André Alexis, David Bergen, Michael Crummey, Elizabeth Hay, Yann Martel, Lisa Moore, Heather O’Neill, Eden Robinson, Neil Smith, Timothy Taylor, Madeleine Thien, M.G. Vassanji, and Alissa York, among many others. With this twentieth edition, featuring an introduction by the jury and comments from a stellar group of high-profile past contributors, The Journey Prize Stories continues to take the pulse of Canada’s literary scene.

The stories included in the anthology are contenders for the $1,000 Writers’ Trust McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize.

Author

ALEXANDER MACLEOD was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of stories, Light Lifting, was a national bestseller, won an Atlantic Book Award, and was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Thomas Head Raddall Fiction Award, and the Commonwealth Book Prize. His most recent book of fiction, Animal Person, won the Dartmouth Book Award for Fiction, was named a Best Book of the Year by The New Yorker, CBC Books, and the Globe and Mail, and includes stories that were featured in The New Yorker, Granta, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. In 2019, he won an O. Henry Award for his story “Lagomorph.” MacLeod holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill University. He currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

SOUVANKHAM THAMMAVONGSA's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Best American Non-Required Reading, The Journey Prize Stories, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Her debut book of fiction, How to Pronounce Knife, won the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the 2021 Trillium Book Award, and was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN America Open Book Award, the Danuta Gleed Award, and one of Time's Must-Read Books of 2020. Thammavongsa is also the author of four poetry books: Light, winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Found; Small Arguments, winner of the ReLit Award; and, most recently, Cluster. Born in the Lao refugee camp in Nong Khai, Thailand, she was raised and educated in Toronto, where she is at work on her first novel. View titles by Various

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