On Shattered Ground

A Civil War Mosaic, 1861-1865

Author Various
A WIDE-RANGING COLLECTION OF CIVIL WAR DOCUMENTS
This comprehensive anthology of original documents traces the American Civil War from its beginnings with the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln to the surrender and assassination with which it ended. With historical sources ranging from public documents, newspaper articles and personal reminiscences to fiction, songs, and poems written by participants and observers, these primary documents and images capture the wide spectrum of individuals who all experienced the profound effects of the American Civil War on both the Union and Confederacy sides as well as on the nation as a whole. Statesmen, citizens, generals, soldiers, abolitionists, slaves, journalists, and artists all give voice to the day-to-day reality of a devastating conflict that reached into the homes and lives of the average American in a way no American war had before…or has since.
ALEXANDER MACLEOD was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of stories, Light Lifting, was a national bestseller, won an Atlantic Book Award, and was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Thomas Head Raddall Fiction Award, and the Commonwealth Book Prize. His most recent book of fiction, Animal Person, won the Dartmouth Book Award for Fiction, was named a Best Book of the Year by The New Yorker, CBC Books, and the Globe and Mail, and includes stories that were featured in The New Yorker, Granta, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. In 2019, he won an O. Henry Award for his story “Lagomorph.” MacLeod holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill University. He currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

SOUVANKHAM THAMMAVONGSA's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Best American Non-Required Reading, The Journey Prize Stories, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Her debut book of fiction, How to Pronounce Knife, won the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the 2021 Trillium Book Award, and was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN America Open Book Award, the Danuta Gleed Award, and one of Time's Must-Read Books of 2020. Thammavongsa is also the author of four poetry books: Light, winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Found; Small Arguments, winner of the ReLit Award; and, most recently, Cluster. Born in the Lao refugee camp in Nong Khai, Thailand, she was raised and educated in Toronto, where she is at work on her first novel. View titles by Various

About

A WIDE-RANGING COLLECTION OF CIVIL WAR DOCUMENTS
This comprehensive anthology of original documents traces the American Civil War from its beginnings with the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln to the surrender and assassination with which it ended. With historical sources ranging from public documents, newspaper articles and personal reminiscences to fiction, songs, and poems written by participants and observers, these primary documents and images capture the wide spectrum of individuals who all experienced the profound effects of the American Civil War on both the Union and Confederacy sides as well as on the nation as a whole. Statesmen, citizens, generals, soldiers, abolitionists, slaves, journalists, and artists all give voice to the day-to-day reality of a devastating conflict that reached into the homes and lives of the average American in a way no American war had before…or has since.

Author

ALEXANDER MACLEOD was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of stories, Light Lifting, was a national bestseller, won an Atlantic Book Award, and was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Thomas Head Raddall Fiction Award, and the Commonwealth Book Prize. His most recent book of fiction, Animal Person, won the Dartmouth Book Award for Fiction, was named a Best Book of the Year by The New Yorker, CBC Books, and the Globe and Mail, and includes stories that were featured in The New Yorker, Granta, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. In 2019, he won an O. Henry Award for his story “Lagomorph.” MacLeod holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill University. He currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

SOUVANKHAM THAMMAVONGSA's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Best American Non-Required Reading, The Journey Prize Stories, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Her debut book of fiction, How to Pronounce Knife, won the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the 2021 Trillium Book Award, and was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN America Open Book Award, the Danuta Gleed Award, and one of Time's Must-Read Books of 2020. Thammavongsa is also the author of four poetry books: Light, winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Found; Small Arguments, winner of the ReLit Award; and, most recently, Cluster. Born in the Lao refugee camp in Nong Khai, Thailand, she was raised and educated in Toronto, where she is at work on her first novel. View titles by Various

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