During the pivotal period of America's international emergence, between the Civil War and WWI, the aligned literary movements of Realism and Naturalism not only shaped the national literature of the age, but also left an indelible and far-reaching influence on twentieth-century American and world literature. Seeking to strip narrative from pious sentimentalities, and, according to William Dean Howells, to "paint life as it is, and human feelings in their true proportion and relation," Realism is best represented by this volume's masterly pieces by Twain, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Kate Chopin, and Willa Cather among others. The joining of Realist methods with the theories of Marx, Darwin, and Spencer to reveal the larger forces (biological, evolutionary, historical) which move humankind, are exemplified here in the fiction of such writers as Jack London, Frank Norris, and Theodore Dreiser.
Introduction:
The Historical Context by Tom Quirk
The Literary Context by James Nagel
Suggestions for Further Reading
Chronology

Part I: Regionalism and Local Color
MARK TWAIN, "Jim Smiley and His Jumping Frog"
BRET HARTE, "The Luck of Roaring Camp"
HARRIET BEECHER STOWE, "The Minister's Housekeeper"
GEORGE WASHINGTON CABLE, "Belles Demoiselles Plantation"
CONSTANCE FENIMORE WOOLSON, "Rodman the Keeper"
SARAH ORNE JEWETT, "A White Heron"
MARY WILKINS FREEMAN, "A Church Mouse"
ROSE TERRY COOKE, "How Celia Changed Her Mind"
GRACE ELIZABETH KING, "La Grande Demoiselle"
KATE CHOPIN," Athénaïse"
ALICE DUNBAR-NELSON, "The Goodness of Saint Rocque"

Part II: Realism
JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS, "Free Joe and the Rest of the World"
SARAH ORNE JEWETT, "Miss Tempy's Watchers"
CHARLES W. CHESNUTT, "The Sheriff's Children"
HAMLIN GARLAND, "The Return of a Private"
AMBROSE BIERCE, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"
MARY WILKINS FREEMAN, "The Revolt of 'Mother'"
HAROLD FREDERIC, "My Aunt Susan"
HENRY JAMES, "The Real Thing"
CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN, "The Yellow Wallpaper"
KATE CHOPIN, "Désirée's Baby"
MADELENE YALE WYNNE, "The Little Room"
HENRY JAMES, "The Beast in the Jungle"
STEPHEN CRANE, "The Blue Hotel"
STEPHEN CRANE, "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky"
ABRAHAM CAHAN, "A Providential Match"
ALICE DUNBAR-NELSON, "Sister Josepha"
CHARLES W. CHESTNUTT, "The Wife of His Youth"
ZITKALA-SÄ, "The Trial Path"
EDITH WHARTON, "The Other Two"
WILLA CATHER, "A Wagner Matinée"
WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS, "Editha"
MARY AUSTIN, "The Walking Woman"
ZONA GALE, "Nobody Rich, Nobody Poor"
SUI SIN FAR, "Mrs. Spring Fragrance"

Part III: Naturalism
STEPHEN CRANE, "The Men in the Storm"
STEPHEN CRANE, "An Experiment in Misery"
STEPHEN CRANE, "The Open Boat"
HAMLIN GARLAND, "Under the Lion's Paw"
THEODORE DREISER, "Curious Shifts of the Poor"
JACK LONDON, "The Law of Life"
FRANK NORRIS, "A Deal in Wheat"
PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR, "The Lynching of Jube Benson"
JOHN M. OSKISON, "The Problem of Old Harjo"
JACK LONDON, "To Build a Fire"
THEODORE DREISER, "The Second Choice"

Biographical Notes
Notes on the Texts

ALEXANDER MACLEOD was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of stories, Light Lifting, was a national bestseller, won an Atlantic Book Award, and was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Thomas Head Raddall Fiction Award, and the Commonwealth Book Prize. His most recent book of fiction, Animal Person, won the Dartmouth Book Award for Fiction, was named a Best Book of the Year by The New Yorker, CBC Books, and the Globe and Mail, and includes stories that were featured in The New Yorker, Granta, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. In 2019, he won an O. Henry Award for his story “Lagomorph.” MacLeod holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill University. He currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

SOUVANKHAM THAMMAVONGSA's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Best American Non-Required Reading, The Journey Prize Stories, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Her debut book of fiction, How to Pronounce Knife, won the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the 2021 Trillium Book Award, and was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN America Open Book Award, the Danuta Gleed Award, and one of Time's Must-Read Books of 2020. Thammavongsa is also the author of four poetry books: Light, winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Found; Small Arguments, winner of the ReLit Award; and, most recently, Cluster. Born in the Lao refugee camp in Nong Khai, Thailand, she was raised and educated in Toronto, where she is at work on her first novel. View titles by Various

About

During the pivotal period of America's international emergence, between the Civil War and WWI, the aligned literary movements of Realism and Naturalism not only shaped the national literature of the age, but also left an indelible and far-reaching influence on twentieth-century American and world literature. Seeking to strip narrative from pious sentimentalities, and, according to William Dean Howells, to "paint life as it is, and human feelings in their true proportion and relation," Realism is best represented by this volume's masterly pieces by Twain, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Kate Chopin, and Willa Cather among others. The joining of Realist methods with the theories of Marx, Darwin, and Spencer to reveal the larger forces (biological, evolutionary, historical) which move humankind, are exemplified here in the fiction of such writers as Jack London, Frank Norris, and Theodore Dreiser.

Table of Contents

Introduction:
The Historical Context by Tom Quirk
The Literary Context by James Nagel
Suggestions for Further Reading
Chronology

Part I: Regionalism and Local Color
MARK TWAIN, "Jim Smiley and His Jumping Frog"
BRET HARTE, "The Luck of Roaring Camp"
HARRIET BEECHER STOWE, "The Minister's Housekeeper"
GEORGE WASHINGTON CABLE, "Belles Demoiselles Plantation"
CONSTANCE FENIMORE WOOLSON, "Rodman the Keeper"
SARAH ORNE JEWETT, "A White Heron"
MARY WILKINS FREEMAN, "A Church Mouse"
ROSE TERRY COOKE, "How Celia Changed Her Mind"
GRACE ELIZABETH KING, "La Grande Demoiselle"
KATE CHOPIN," Athénaïse"
ALICE DUNBAR-NELSON, "The Goodness of Saint Rocque"

Part II: Realism
JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS, "Free Joe and the Rest of the World"
SARAH ORNE JEWETT, "Miss Tempy's Watchers"
CHARLES W. CHESNUTT, "The Sheriff's Children"
HAMLIN GARLAND, "The Return of a Private"
AMBROSE BIERCE, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"
MARY WILKINS FREEMAN, "The Revolt of 'Mother'"
HAROLD FREDERIC, "My Aunt Susan"
HENRY JAMES, "The Real Thing"
CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN, "The Yellow Wallpaper"
KATE CHOPIN, "Désirée's Baby"
MADELENE YALE WYNNE, "The Little Room"
HENRY JAMES, "The Beast in the Jungle"
STEPHEN CRANE, "The Blue Hotel"
STEPHEN CRANE, "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky"
ABRAHAM CAHAN, "A Providential Match"
ALICE DUNBAR-NELSON, "Sister Josepha"
CHARLES W. CHESTNUTT, "The Wife of His Youth"
ZITKALA-SÄ, "The Trial Path"
EDITH WHARTON, "The Other Two"
WILLA CATHER, "A Wagner Matinée"
WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS, "Editha"
MARY AUSTIN, "The Walking Woman"
ZONA GALE, "Nobody Rich, Nobody Poor"
SUI SIN FAR, "Mrs. Spring Fragrance"

Part III: Naturalism
STEPHEN CRANE, "The Men in the Storm"
STEPHEN CRANE, "An Experiment in Misery"
STEPHEN CRANE, "The Open Boat"
HAMLIN GARLAND, "Under the Lion's Paw"
THEODORE DREISER, "Curious Shifts of the Poor"
JACK LONDON, "The Law of Life"
FRANK NORRIS, "A Deal in Wheat"
PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR, "The Lynching of Jube Benson"
JOHN M. OSKISON, "The Problem of Old Harjo"
JACK LONDON, "To Build a Fire"
THEODORE DREISER, "The Second Choice"

Biographical Notes
Notes on the Texts

Author

ALEXANDER MACLEOD was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of stories, Light Lifting, was a national bestseller, won an Atlantic Book Award, and was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Thomas Head Raddall Fiction Award, and the Commonwealth Book Prize. His most recent book of fiction, Animal Person, won the Dartmouth Book Award for Fiction, was named a Best Book of the Year by The New Yorker, CBC Books, and the Globe and Mail, and includes stories that were featured in The New Yorker, Granta, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. In 2019, he won an O. Henry Award for his story “Lagomorph.” MacLeod holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill University. He currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

SOUVANKHAM THAMMAVONGSA's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Best American Non-Required Reading, The Journey Prize Stories, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Her debut book of fiction, How to Pronounce Knife, won the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the 2021 Trillium Book Award, and was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN America Open Book Award, the Danuta Gleed Award, and one of Time's Must-Read Books of 2020. Thammavongsa is also the author of four poetry books: Light, winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Found; Small Arguments, winner of the ReLit Award; and, most recently, Cluster. Born in the Lao refugee camp in Nong Khai, Thailand, she was raised and educated in Toronto, where she is at work on her first novel. View titles by Various

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