Who Was Robert E. Lee?

Part of Who Was?

Illustrated by John O'Brien
Ebook
On sale Jun 26, 2014 | 112 Pages | 978-0-698-17186-2
Robert E. Lee seemed destined for greatness. His father was a Revolutionary War hero and at West Point he graduated second in his class! In 1861, when the Southern states seceded from the Union, Lee was offered the opportunity to command the Union forces. However, even though he was against the war, his loyalty to his home state of Virginia wouldn’t let him fight for the North. Despite the South’s ultimate defeat, General Robert E. Lee remains one of the United States’ true military heroes.
Who Was
Robert E. Lee?

On January 19, 1807, in Westmoreland County, Virginia, Robert Edward Lee was born. Robert’s father was Henry Lee. His nickname was Light Horse Harry. In the Revolutionary War, he was in charge of troops that rode on horseback. He was a strong fighter, a risk-taker, a hero. He was also a good friend of George Washington.

The Lees of Virginia were famous throughout the United States. Like Henry Lee, many had fought in the Revolutionary War. Two of Robert’s cousins were among the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Robert grew up with a great love for his country. Yet, in 1861, the country he so admired was torn apart by the start of the Civil War. Robert was torn, too. He wanted the country to remain united. He did not want the South to break away from the United States and form a separate country. But that is what happened.

When asked to lead Northern troops against the South, Robert E. Lee was even more torn. How could he go to war against his friends and family who lived in Virginia? It was a hard choice. Robert thought about loyalty. He thought about honor. In the end, Robert decided to fight against the country that his forefathers helped to create. For Robert the most important thing to him was his family, and his home: Virginia.

Chapter 1
Lessons Learned

Bonnie Bader is a prolific author of nonfiction children's books, including My Little Golden Book About Whales, Hanukkah: The Festival of Lights, My Little Golden Book About Abraham Lincoln, and My Little Golden Book About Bugs.

Steph Laberis graduated from Rhode Island School of Design. She creates art for children's products and books, including My Little Golden Book About Whales, My Little Golden Book About Sharks, and My Little Golden Book About Dinosaurs. View titles by Bonnie Bader
Who HQ is your headquarters for history. The Who HQ team is always working to provide simple and clear answers to some of our biggest questions. From Who Was George Washington? to Who Is Michelle Obama?, and What Was the Battle of Gettysburg? to Where Is the Great Barrier Reef?, we strive to give you all the facts. Visit us at WhoHQ.com View titles by Who HQ
John O’Brien has held writing fellowships at the University of Iowa and Stanford University, and he was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship. His work has appeared in Hudson ReviewMassachusetts ReviewTriQuarterlyCountry JournalHarrowsmith, and Gray’s Sporting Journal. He lives with his wife, Becky, in Franklin, West Virginia. View titles by John O'Brien

About

Robert E. Lee seemed destined for greatness. His father was a Revolutionary War hero and at West Point he graduated second in his class! In 1861, when the Southern states seceded from the Union, Lee was offered the opportunity to command the Union forces. However, even though he was against the war, his loyalty to his home state of Virginia wouldn’t let him fight for the North. Despite the South’s ultimate defeat, General Robert E. Lee remains one of the United States’ true military heroes.

Excerpt

Who Was
Robert E. Lee?

On January 19, 1807, in Westmoreland County, Virginia, Robert Edward Lee was born. Robert’s father was Henry Lee. His nickname was Light Horse Harry. In the Revolutionary War, he was in charge of troops that rode on horseback. He was a strong fighter, a risk-taker, a hero. He was also a good friend of George Washington.

The Lees of Virginia were famous throughout the United States. Like Henry Lee, many had fought in the Revolutionary War. Two of Robert’s cousins were among the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Robert grew up with a great love for his country. Yet, in 1861, the country he so admired was torn apart by the start of the Civil War. Robert was torn, too. He wanted the country to remain united. He did not want the South to break away from the United States and form a separate country. But that is what happened.

When asked to lead Northern troops against the South, Robert E. Lee was even more torn. How could he go to war against his friends and family who lived in Virginia? It was a hard choice. Robert thought about loyalty. He thought about honor. In the end, Robert decided to fight against the country that his forefathers helped to create. For Robert the most important thing to him was his family, and his home: Virginia.

Chapter 1
Lessons Learned

Author

Bonnie Bader is a prolific author of nonfiction children's books, including My Little Golden Book About Whales, Hanukkah: The Festival of Lights, My Little Golden Book About Abraham Lincoln, and My Little Golden Book About Bugs.

Steph Laberis graduated from Rhode Island School of Design. She creates art for children's products and books, including My Little Golden Book About Whales, My Little Golden Book About Sharks, and My Little Golden Book About Dinosaurs. View titles by Bonnie Bader
Who HQ is your headquarters for history. The Who HQ team is always working to provide simple and clear answers to some of our biggest questions. From Who Was George Washington? to Who Is Michelle Obama?, and What Was the Battle of Gettysburg? to Where Is the Great Barrier Reef?, we strive to give you all the facts. Visit us at WhoHQ.com View titles by Who HQ
John O’Brien has held writing fellowships at the University of Iowa and Stanford University, and he was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship. His work has appeared in Hudson ReviewMassachusetts ReviewTriQuarterlyCountry JournalHarrowsmith, and Gray’s Sporting Journal. He lives with his wife, Becky, in Franklin, West Virginia. View titles by John O'Brien