The Man in the Iron Mask

Introduction by Roger Celestin
Afterword by Jack Zipes
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Mass Market Paperback
$8.95 US
On sale May 02, 2006 | 480 Pages | 978-0-451-53013-4
Deep inside the dreaded Bastille, a young prisoner has languished, his face hidden from all, for eight long years. He knows neither his true identity nor the crime that got him there. Then Aramis, one of the original three musketeers—the finest swordsmen in all of France—bribes his way into the young man’s cell to reveal the shocking truth. The revelation of this truth could very well topple Louis XIV, King of France, from his throne—and Aramis aims to do just that.

But a daring jailbreak, a brilliant masquerade, and a bloody fight for the throne may make Aramis betray his sacred vow of “All for one, one for all.” And in so doing, he will pit musketeer against musketeer, bringing an end to this swashbuckling saga—and either honor or disgrace upon them all.…

“The name Alexandre Dumas is more than French—it is universal.”—Victor Hugo

With a New Introduction by Roger Celestin and an Afterword by Jack Zipes

 

Alexandre Dumas (1802–1870) lived a life as romantic as that depicted in his famous novels. He was born in Villers-Cotterêts, France. His early education was scanty, but his beautiful handwriting secured him a position in Paris in 1822 with the du’Orléans, where he read voraciously and began to write. His first play, Henri III et sa cour (1829), scored a resounding success for its author and the romantic movement. His lavish spending and flamboyant habits led to the construction of his fabulous Château de Monte-Cristo, and in 1851 he fled to Belgium to escape creditors. Dumas’s overall literary output reached more than 277 volumes, but his brilliant historical novels made him the most universally read of all French novelists. With collaborators, mainly Auguste Maquet, Dumas wrote such works as The Three Musketeers (1843–1844); its sequels, Twenty Years After (1845) and the great mystery The Man in the Iron Mask (1845–1850); and The Count of Monte Cristo (1844). His work ignored historical accuracy, psychology, and analysis, but its thrilling adventure and exuberant inventiveness continued to delight readers, and Dumas remains one of the prodigies of nineteenth-century French literature. View titles by Alexandre Dumas

About

Deep inside the dreaded Bastille, a young prisoner has languished, his face hidden from all, for eight long years. He knows neither his true identity nor the crime that got him there. Then Aramis, one of the original three musketeers—the finest swordsmen in all of France—bribes his way into the young man’s cell to reveal the shocking truth. The revelation of this truth could very well topple Louis XIV, King of France, from his throne—and Aramis aims to do just that.

But a daring jailbreak, a brilliant masquerade, and a bloody fight for the throne may make Aramis betray his sacred vow of “All for one, one for all.” And in so doing, he will pit musketeer against musketeer, bringing an end to this swashbuckling saga—and either honor or disgrace upon them all.…

“The name Alexandre Dumas is more than French—it is universal.”—Victor Hugo

With a New Introduction by Roger Celestin and an Afterword by Jack Zipes

 

Author

Alexandre Dumas (1802–1870) lived a life as romantic as that depicted in his famous novels. He was born in Villers-Cotterêts, France. His early education was scanty, but his beautiful handwriting secured him a position in Paris in 1822 with the du’Orléans, where he read voraciously and began to write. His first play, Henri III et sa cour (1829), scored a resounding success for its author and the romantic movement. His lavish spending and flamboyant habits led to the construction of his fabulous Château de Monte-Cristo, and in 1851 he fled to Belgium to escape creditors. Dumas’s overall literary output reached more than 277 volumes, but his brilliant historical novels made him the most universally read of all French novelists. With collaborators, mainly Auguste Maquet, Dumas wrote such works as The Three Musketeers (1843–1844); its sequels, Twenty Years After (1845) and the great mystery The Man in the Iron Mask (1845–1850); and The Count of Monte Cristo (1844). His work ignored historical accuracy, psychology, and analysis, but its thrilling adventure and exuberant inventiveness continued to delight readers, and Dumas remains one of the prodigies of nineteenth-century French literature. View titles by Alexandre Dumas

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