The Blythes Are Quoted

Penguin Modern Classics Edition

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On sale Jul 03, 2018 | 544 Pages | 9780735234680
With an Afterword by Elizabeth Rollins Epperly
 
L.M. Montgomery won the world over with the young, tenacious Anne and her adventures. Now, in the last book she completed shortly before her death in 1942, we remember the beloved author and her enduring literary legacy.

Edited and introduced by Benjamin Lefebvre, this final book consists of Montgomery’s final sequel to her internationally bestselling Anne of Green Gables. In an unusual twist to her writing style, Montgomery employs a mix of stories, poems, and vignettes, not telling one particular narrative but instead presenting snapshots of new and familiar residents of Glen St. Mary, of Anne and her family, and of their discussions around the poems composed by Anne and later by her son Walter.

In these final glimpses of characters known the world over, Montgomery offers readers a parting gift, a final farewell from herself, and from Anne.
Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942) was born in the village of Clifton (now New London) on Prince Edward Island in Canada. She was brought up by her grandparents after her mother died when she was two. Later her father moved away to Saskatchewan, where he remarried, and when she spent some months in his new home she was not happy. 'I do not think', she wrote, 'that the majority of grownups have any real conception of the tortures sensitive children suffer over any marked difference between themselves and the other denizens of their small world.'

While working as a reporter for the Halifax Daily Echo, she wrote Anne of Green Gables in the evenings over a period of eighteen months and when it was rejected by four publishers she put it away for two years. Then she revised it and a Boston publisher accepted it at once. When it appeared in 1908 the book proved so popular that ever afterwards she felt constrained by the public's constant demand for more stories about Anne. She did write five sequels – as well as many other novels – and they made her rich, but none reached the classic status of the first.

In 1911 she married Ewan Macdonald. She had two sons; she enjoyed fame and was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935. She died in Toronto in 1942 and was buried in Cavendish Cemetery, not far from her birthplace. View titles by L. M. Montgomery

About

With an Afterword by Elizabeth Rollins Epperly
 
L.M. Montgomery won the world over with the young, tenacious Anne and her adventures. Now, in the last book she completed shortly before her death in 1942, we remember the beloved author and her enduring literary legacy.

Edited and introduced by Benjamin Lefebvre, this final book consists of Montgomery’s final sequel to her internationally bestselling Anne of Green Gables. In an unusual twist to her writing style, Montgomery employs a mix of stories, poems, and vignettes, not telling one particular narrative but instead presenting snapshots of new and familiar residents of Glen St. Mary, of Anne and her family, and of their discussions around the poems composed by Anne and later by her son Walter.

In these final glimpses of characters known the world over, Montgomery offers readers a parting gift, a final farewell from herself, and from Anne.

Author

Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942) was born in the village of Clifton (now New London) on Prince Edward Island in Canada. She was brought up by her grandparents after her mother died when she was two. Later her father moved away to Saskatchewan, where he remarried, and when she spent some months in his new home she was not happy. 'I do not think', she wrote, 'that the majority of grownups have any real conception of the tortures sensitive children suffer over any marked difference between themselves and the other denizens of their small world.'

While working as a reporter for the Halifax Daily Echo, she wrote Anne of Green Gables in the evenings over a period of eighteen months and when it was rejected by four publishers she put it away for two years. Then she revised it and a Boston publisher accepted it at once. When it appeared in 1908 the book proved so popular that ever afterwards she felt constrained by the public's constant demand for more stories about Anne. She did write five sequels – as well as many other novels – and they made her rich, but none reached the classic status of the first.

In 1911 she married Ewan Macdonald. She had two sons; she enjoyed fame and was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935. She died in Toronto in 1942 and was buried in Cavendish Cemetery, not far from her birthplace. View titles by L. M. Montgomery

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