Rolling Warrior

The Incredible, Sometimes Awkward, True Story of a Rebel Girl on Wheels Who Helped Spark a Revolution

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Paperback
$15.95 US
On sale Jun 15, 2021 | 216 Pages | 9780807003596
As featured in the Oscar-nominated documentary Crip Camp, and for readers of I Am Malala, one of the most influential disability rights activists in US history tells her story of fighting to belong.

“If I didn’t fight, who would?”

Judy Heumann was only 5 years old when she was first denied her right to attend school. Paralyzed from polio and raised by her Holocaust-surviving parents in New York City, Judy had a drive for equality that was instilled early in life.

In this young readers’ edition of her acclaimed memoir, Being Heumann, Judy shares her journey of battling for equal access in an unequal world—from fighting to attend grade school after being described as a “fire hazard” because of her wheelchair, to suing the New York City school system for denying her a teacher’s license because of her disability. Judy went on to lead 150 disabled people in the longest sit-in protest in US history at the San Francisco Federal Building. Cut off from the outside world, the group slept on office floors, faced down bomb threats, and risked their lives to win the world’s attention and the first civil rights legislation for disabled people.

Judy’s bravery, persistence, and signature rebellious streak will speak to every person fighting to belong and fighting for social justice.
Prologue

PART ONE

CHAPTER ONE
Yelling at blank walls

CHAPTER TWO
Time for rest hour, kids

CHAPTER THREE
Sorry, if you could just hide behind everyone else that would be great

CHAPTER FOUR
If you’re not busy, can you help me into bed?

CHAPTER FIVE
You want me to what?

CHAPTER SIX
The last drop

CHAPTER SEVEN
Are you Judy Heumann?

CHAPTER EIGHT
The fight

CHAPTER NINE
Am I reading correctly?

PART TWO

CHAPTER TEN
Weird sleepover

CHAPTER ELEVEN
And suddenly, we’re visible

CHAPTER TWELVE
Dinner tonight courtesy of the Black Panthers

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
The government threatens us with bombs

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
We threaten the government with more sleepovers

CHAPTER FIFTEEN
House party at Califano’s

CHAPTER SIXTEEN
There are no accessible bathrooms in the White House

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Please don’t ignore us or we will come to your Sunday school

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
Power to the people

PART THREE: FOUR YEARS LATER

CHAPTER NINETEEN
Thirty-six million of us

EPILOGUE
And next

Acknowledgments
Credits
Judith Heumann is an internationally recognized leader in the Disability Rights Independent Living Movement. She has served in the Clinton and Obama administrations, and she was the World Bank’s first adviser on disability and development. Heumann is the author of a memoir, Being Heumann, and her story was featured in the Netflix documentary Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution (2020). Connect with her on Twitter (@judithheumann) and Facebook (TheHeumannPerspective).

Kristen Joiner is a writer, activist, and producer. She is the co-author of Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of a Disability Rights Activist and the YA version of the book, Rolling Warrior: The Incredible, Sometimes Awkward, True Story of a Rebel Girl on Wheels Who Helped Spark a Revolution with Judy Heumann, Former Advisor to Presidents Clinton and Obama, star of the Oscar-nominated Crip Camp, and one of the most influential disability rights activists in US history. Being Heumann has been optioned by Apple TV for a feature film directed by Oscar-winner Sian Heder (C.O.D.A.). Kristen co-founded the youth filmmaking organization, Scenarios USA, and executive produced short films written by young people and directed by award-winning directors. She lives in New Zealand with her family.

About

As featured in the Oscar-nominated documentary Crip Camp, and for readers of I Am Malala, one of the most influential disability rights activists in US history tells her story of fighting to belong.

“If I didn’t fight, who would?”

Judy Heumann was only 5 years old when she was first denied her right to attend school. Paralyzed from polio and raised by her Holocaust-surviving parents in New York City, Judy had a drive for equality that was instilled early in life.

In this young readers’ edition of her acclaimed memoir, Being Heumann, Judy shares her journey of battling for equal access in an unequal world—from fighting to attend grade school after being described as a “fire hazard” because of her wheelchair, to suing the New York City school system for denying her a teacher’s license because of her disability. Judy went on to lead 150 disabled people in the longest sit-in protest in US history at the San Francisco Federal Building. Cut off from the outside world, the group slept on office floors, faced down bomb threats, and risked their lives to win the world’s attention and the first civil rights legislation for disabled people.

Judy’s bravery, persistence, and signature rebellious streak will speak to every person fighting to belong and fighting for social justice.

Table of Contents

Prologue

PART ONE

CHAPTER ONE
Yelling at blank walls

CHAPTER TWO
Time for rest hour, kids

CHAPTER THREE
Sorry, if you could just hide behind everyone else that would be great

CHAPTER FOUR
If you’re not busy, can you help me into bed?

CHAPTER FIVE
You want me to what?

CHAPTER SIX
The last drop

CHAPTER SEVEN
Are you Judy Heumann?

CHAPTER EIGHT
The fight

CHAPTER NINE
Am I reading correctly?

PART TWO

CHAPTER TEN
Weird sleepover

CHAPTER ELEVEN
And suddenly, we’re visible

CHAPTER TWELVE
Dinner tonight courtesy of the Black Panthers

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
The government threatens us with bombs

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
We threaten the government with more sleepovers

CHAPTER FIFTEEN
House party at Califano’s

CHAPTER SIXTEEN
There are no accessible bathrooms in the White House

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Please don’t ignore us or we will come to your Sunday school

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
Power to the people

PART THREE: FOUR YEARS LATER

CHAPTER NINETEEN
Thirty-six million of us

EPILOGUE
And next

Acknowledgments
Credits

Author

Judith Heumann is an internationally recognized leader in the Disability Rights Independent Living Movement. She has served in the Clinton and Obama administrations, and she was the World Bank’s first adviser on disability and development. Heumann is the author of a memoir, Being Heumann, and her story was featured in the Netflix documentary Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution (2020). Connect with her on Twitter (@judithheumann) and Facebook (TheHeumannPerspective).

Kristen Joiner is a writer, activist, and producer. She is the co-author of Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of a Disability Rights Activist and the YA version of the book, Rolling Warrior: The Incredible, Sometimes Awkward, True Story of a Rebel Girl on Wheels Who Helped Spark a Revolution with Judy Heumann, Former Advisor to Presidents Clinton and Obama, star of the Oscar-nominated Crip Camp, and one of the most influential disability rights activists in US history. Being Heumann has been optioned by Apple TV for a feature film directed by Oscar-winner Sian Heder (C.O.D.A.). Kristen co-founded the youth filmmaking organization, Scenarios USA, and executive produced short films written by young people and directed by award-winning directors. She lives in New Zealand with her family.

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