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The Fortune Men

A novel

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In Cardiff, Wales in 1952, Mahmood Mattan, a young Somali sailor, is accused of a crime he did not commit: the brutal killing of Violet Volacki, a shopkeeper from Tiger Bay. At first, Mahmood believes he can ignore the fingers pointing his way; he may be a gambler and a petty thief, but he is no murderer. He is a father of three, secure in his innocence and his belief in British justice.

But as the trial draws closer, his prospect for freedom dwindles. Now, Mahmood must stage a terrifying fight for his life, with all the chips stacked against him: a shoddy investigation, an inhumane legal system, and, most evidently, pervasive and deep-rooted racism at every step.

Under the shadow of the hangman’s noose, Mahmood begins to realize that even the truth may not be enough to save him. A haunting tale of miscarried justice, this book offers a chilling look at the dark corners of our humanity.

BOOKER PRIZE FINALIST
A COSTA BOOK AWARD NOMINEE
ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR

“Nadifa Mohamed’s The Fortune Men is a blues song cut straight from the heart. It tells about the unjust death of an innocent Black man caught up in a corrupt system. Nadifa’s masterful evocation of the full life of Mahmood Mattan, the last man executed in Cardiff for a crime he was exonerated for forty years later, is brought alive with subtle artistry and heartbreaking humanity. In one man’s life Mohamed captures the multitudes of homelands, dialects, hopes, and prayers of Somalis, Jews, Maltese and West Indians drawn in by the ships that filled Wales’ Tiger Bay in the 1950’s, all hoping for a future that eludes Mattan.” —Walter Mosley, author of Devil in a Blue Dress

“A potent, pointed novel. . . . Mohamed is a big talent, and she’s only getting started.” —Dwight Garner, The New York Times

“Equally informative and moving. . . . The immediate allure of the novel is the vibrancy of Mohamed’s prose, her ability to capture the complicated culture of Cardiff and the sound of tortured optimism. . . . The horrific finale of The Fortune Men is never in doubt, but for more than 200 pages Mohamed still creates a sharp sense of suspense by pulling us right into Mahmood’s world as his life tilts and then crashes. . . . There’s a natural grandeur to her portrayal of this ordinary man caught in the city’s gears. Readers will hear echoes of Dostoevsky and Kafka in her re-creation of this nightmare. . . . With The Fortune Men, Mohamed has given us a clear vision of so many victims caught in the maw of racist legal systems.” —Ron Charles, The Washington Post

“Brilliantly depicts the complexities of community within the Black diaspora . . . Mohamed balances colonial history and violence with the evocative interior lives of Mahmood and Violet Volacki. . . . After Mahmood’s arrest, the novel shifts its focus to the British criminal justice system, providing a visceral account of the protagonist’s carceral experience. . . . Mohamed manages such tender detail even while zooming out on the British prison and court systems more broadly.” —Nicole R. Fleetwood, The New York Times

“Searing. . . . Mohamed maintains a high level of tension as the tragedy slowly unfolds. . . . This is a powerful portrayal of an innocent man trapped by a racist system that will resonate with readers familiar with such travesties of justice in the U.S.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“[The Fortune Men] poignantly imagines Mattan’s trial and his time in jail, as his hopes of freedom dwindle. Mohamed underscores Mattan’s confidence in his good character—his belief that ‘the truth kill the lie’—while also showing how, ‘as each witness takes the stand, his previous estimation of his own power diminishes.’” —The New Yorker

“Searing, affecting and distressingly relevant. . . . The Fortune Men, which was shortlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize, manages an intimate presentation of Mattan’s experience. . . . In fictionalizing this story of a lethal miscarriage of justice, Somali-born British writer Nadifa Mohamed has crafted a mesmerizing novel that, notwithstanding its historical setting, has disconcerting resonance for the present.” —Steven W. Beattie, The Toronto Star

“The writing carries a depth of humanity that puts the reader right in the shoes of the characters — the clothes they wear, the streets they walk, the emotions they feel. . . . [The Fortune Men] is filled with the hope of how things should be and the truth of how things are. All of it, the life of Mahmood Mattan, the system convicting him of this murder, and the community that allows it, all brought painfully into focus with Mohamed’s unflinching and gifted prose.” —Urban Waite, San Francisco Chronicle

“[The Fortune Men] was shortlisted for the Booker Prize this year, and it’s not hard to see why: It’s a riveting tale in which Mohamed brings to life a 1950s port city and the injustice that occurred there.” —Wadzanai Mhute, Oprah Daily

“Provocative and evocative. . . . A memorable portrait. . . . [The Fortune Men] is an intimate look at a man whose pride is seen as defiance and whose refusal to be demeaned proves dangerous to a Black man and a foreigner. . . . Mohamed vividly draws the brawling and diverse tough-luck world of the Cardiff docks.” —Stuart Miller, Boston Globe

“Great literary deftness. . . . Mohamed never overdoes things, nor does she reduce any character to stereotype. . . . The Fortune Men gives us richly satisfying insight into the life of the victim himself. . . . Balancing the slow horror of the legal process and the indifference (at best) of the ‘system’ to Mahmood’s plight, Mohamed gives us a wonderfully subtle portrait of Mahmood’s Welsh family.” —Simon Lewis, The Post and Courier

“Compelling. . . . [Mohamed’s] work recovers the intimate lives of men and women caught up in the tumult of history.” —CBC Radio

“Riveting. . . . Memorable. . . . The Fortune Men is a sweeping indictment of British jurisprudence and the many forms prejudice can take. . . . Most poignant of all is the portrait of Mahmood, a proud Muslim who retains his hope and humanity even in the face of the most brutal of injustices.” —Michael Magras, Shelf Awareness

The Fortune Men is that rare novel that breaks your heart and, in so doing, gives you life. Nadifa Mohamed is a revelationshe writes with the fierce compassionate lightning of a truth-teller, lays bare the ghastly colonial condition that afflicts so many of us, where truth cannot overcome injustice. If a novel can be an avenger then The Fortune Men is the one we've all been waiting for.” —Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

“Heart-wrenching. . . . This powerful, deeply affecting exploration of mid-twentieth-century racism and other forms of prejudice has stark relevance today.” —Booklist

“A novel on fire, a restitution of justice in prose. . . . The Fortune Men can be read as a comment on 21st-century Britain and its continued troubled legacy of empire, but also as a beautifully judged fiction in its own right—teeming with life, character and humour, and, particularly, evocative of place.” —Catherine Taylor, Financial Times

“Nadifa Mohamed’s The Fortune Men . . . is an elegant portrayal of life in the racial, cultural hub of Cardiff’s Tiger Bay in the early Fifties. Eschewing a simple morality play for complex vivid characters, it centers on the plight of Mahmood Mattan, who finds himself in the shadow of the hangman’s noose for a murder he didn’t commit.” —Gary Younge, The New Statesman, “Books of the year”

“A miraculous feat. . . . [Mohamed] brings magic to her project, achieving in fiction what no historical account could match. . . . In a reversal of the western perspective, Mohamed shows us Britain through the eyes of this outsider, the Black African, the Muslim. It’s an eye-opening angle of vision and an unforgettable one. . . . Mahmood Mattan has been rescued. Given new life, he emerges from the pages of The Fortune Men as a full-blooded literary victim-hero with all the complexity that such a status tends to require.” —Claudia Peck, Star Tribune

“Based on a real-life case from 1952, The Fortune Man is a masterpiece in storytelling. It tells of Mahmood Mattan, a Somali seaman who was wrongfully convicted of the murder of Lily Volpert and was one of the last men to be executed in Wales. Mohamed’s ability to examine the blistering racial injustices of the time is sobering and immense.” —Eva Waite-Taylor, The Independent

“Utterly gripping. . . . Nadifa Mohamed’s fictional account of this real-life miscarriage of justice has quite rightly been longlisted for the Booker Prize. . . . She tackles this largely forgotten story with skill and empathy.” —Alex Peake-Tomkinson, Prospect

“An engrossing and tense story . . . the senses of loss and cruelty are palpable . . . [The Fortune Men is] an intimate personal portrait with a broader message on the mistreatment of migrants.” —Kirkus Reviews

“[The Fortune Men is] unbearably wrenching, as racism, inept policing and the lure of a cash reward from the victim’s family combine to corner the father-of-three in a monstrous web of injustice. . . . Mohamed makes the outrage at the book’s heart blazingly unignorable by inhabiting Mattan’s point of view, a bold endeavour pulled off to powerful effect.” —Anthony Cummins, Daily Mail U.K.

The Fortune Men . . . confirms [Mohamed] as a literary star of her generation. . . . When Mohamed’s prose—simple and full of soul—illuminates him, Mahmood emerges as a beacon of humour, hope and endurance.” —Ashish Ghadiali, The Observer

“A writer of great humanity and intelligence. Nadifa Mohamed deeply understands how lives are shaped both by the grand sweep of history and the intimate encounters of human beings.” —Kamila Shamsie, author of Home Fire
 
“The Fortune Men describes how innocence is forced to justify itself before gross injustice. A novel of tremendous power, compassion and subtlety, it feels unsettlingly timely.” —Pankaj Mishra, author of Age of Anger
 
“Nadifa Mohamed just gets better and better. Long regarded as one of our most promising young novelists, she has fully arrived with The Fortune Men. Chilling and utterly compelling, it shines an essential light on a much-neglected period of our national life.” —Sathnam Sanghera, author of EmpireLand: How Modern Britain is Shaped by its Imperial Past
Kow

[ One ]

Tiger Bay, February 1952

The King is dead. Long live the Queen.” The announcer’s voice crackles from the wireless and winds around the rapt patrons of Berlin’s Milk Bar as sinuously as the fog curls around the mournful street lamps, their wan glow barely illuminating the cobblestones.

The noise settles as milkshakes and colas clink against Irish coffees, and chairs scrape against the black-and-white tiled floor.

Berlin hammers a spoon against the bar and calls out with his lion tamer’s bark, “Raise your glasses, ladies and gentlemen, and send off our old King to Davy Jones’s Locker.”

“He’ll meet many of our men down there,” replies Old Ismail, “he better write his apologies on the way down.”

“I b-b-b-et he wr-wr-wr-ote them on his d-d-d-eathbed,” a punter cackles.

Through the rock ’n’ roll and spitting espresso machine Berlin hears someone calling his name. “Maxa tiri  ? ” he asks as Mahmood Mattan pushes through the crowd at the bar.

“I said, get me another coffee.”

Berlin catches his Trinidadian wife’s waist and steers her towards Mahmood. “Lou, sort this troublemaker another coffee.”

Ranged along the bar are many of Tiger Bay’s Somali sailors; they look somewhere between gangsters and dandies in their cravats, pocket chains and trilby hats. Only Mahmood wears a homburg pulled down low over his gaunt face and sad eyes. He is a quiet man, always appearing and disappearing silently, at the fringes of the sailors or the gamblers or the thieves. Men pull their possessions closer when he is around and keep their eyes on his long, elegant fingers, but Tahir Gass—who was only recently released from Whit church asylum—leans close to him, looking for friendship that Mahmood won’t give. Tahir is on a road no one can or will walk down with him, his limbs spasming from invisible electric shocks, his face a cinema screen of wild expressions.

“Independence any day now.” Ismail gulps from his mug and smiles. “India is gone, what can they say to the rest?”

Berlin makes his eyes bold. “They say we got you by the balls, darkie! We own your land, your trains, your rivers, your schools, the coffee grains at the bottom of your cup. You see what they do to the Mau Mau and all the Kikuyu in Kenya? Lock them up, man and child.”

Mahmood takes his espresso from Lou and smirks at the exchange; he cares nothing for politics. While trying to straighten his cufflinks a drop of coffee runs over the rim and falls on to his brightly polished shoes. Grabbing a handkerchief from his trouser pocket, he wipes it off and buffs the stain away. The brogues are new and as black and sharp as Newfoundland coal, better shoes than any other fella here has on his feet. Three £1 notes burn away in his pocket, ready for a poker game; saved through missed lunches and nights spent without the fire, mummified in his blankets. Leaning over the bar, he nudges Ismail. “Billa Khan coming tonight?”

“Me come from the jungle? I wish I come from the jungle! I said to him, look around you, this is the jungle, you got bushes and trees everywhere, in my country nothing grows.” Ismail finishes his joke and then turns to Mahmood. “How would I know? Ask one of your crooks.”

Kissing his teeth, Mahmood throws the espresso down his throat and grabs his fawn mackintosh before stalking through the crowd and out of the door.

The cold air hits his face like a spade, and despite urgently forcing the jacket around his body the bitter February night takes hold of him and makes his teeth chatter. A grey smudge hovers over everything he sees, the result of a hot chink of coal flying from a furnace and into his right eye. A pain so pure that it had hoisted him up and backwards on to the cooling clinkers behind his feet. The clatter of shovels and devil’s picks as the other stokers came to his aid, their hands tearing his fingers from his face. His tears had distorted their familiar faces, their eyes the only bright spots in the gloomy engine room, the emergency alarm clattering as the chief engineer’s boots marched down the steel staircase. Afterwards, two weeks in a hospital in Hamburg with a fat bandage wrapped around his head.

That smudge and a bad back are the only physical remnants of his sea life. He hasn’t boarded a ship for near to three years; just foundry work and poky little boilers in prisons and hospitals. The sea still calls, though, just as loudly as the gulls surfing the sky above him, but there is Laura and the boys to anchor him here. Boys who look Somali despite their mother’s Welsh blood, who cling to his legs calling “Daddy, Daddy, Daddy” and pull his head down, mussing up his pomaded hair for forceful kisses that leave his cheeks smelling of sherbet and milk.

The streets are quiet but the news of the King’s death drifts from many of the low-slung wind-blown terraces he passes. Each wireless set relaying the broadcast discordantly, either a second ahead or delayed. Passing the shops on Bute Street, he finds a few lights still on: at Zussen’s pawnbroker’s where many of his clothes are on hock, at the Cypriot barbershop where he has his hair trimmed and at Volacki’s where he used to buy seafaring kits but now just bags the occasional dress for Laura. The tall grand windows of Cory’s Rest are steamed up, with figures laughing and dancing behind the leaded glass. He peeks his head through the door to check if some of his regulars are there, but the West Indian faces around the snooker table are unfamiliar. He had once belonged to this army of workers pulled in from all over the world, dredged in to replace the thousands of mariners lost in the war: dockers, tallymen, kickers, stevedores, winch men, hatch men, samplers, grain porters, timber porters, tackle men, yard masters, teamers, dock watchmen, needle men, ferrymen, shunters, pilots, tugboat men, foyboatmen, freshwater men, blacksmiths, jetty clerks, warehousemen, measurers, weighers, dredgermen, lumpers, launch men, lightermen, crane drivers, coal trimmers, and his own battalion, the stokers.

Mahmood turns away from the wreathed and porticoed splendour of Cory’s Rest towards the docks, from where a red mist tints the raw, uncooked sky. He enjoys watching the nightly, industrial spectacle: the dirty seawater appearing to catch fire as vats of rippled, white-hot furnace slag from the East Moors Steelworks tip into the lapping evening tide. The railway on the foreshore bank clanking and screeching as carts shoot back and forth between the billowing steelwork chimneys and the angry, steaming sea. It’s an eerie and bewitching sight that catches his breath every time; he half expects an island or volcano to spit out from that bubbling, hissing stretch of petrol-streaked water, but it always cools and returns to its morose, dark uniformity by morning.

The docks and Butetown cover only a square mile but for him and his neighbors it’s a metropolis. Raised up from marshland the century before, a Scottish aristocrat built the docks and named the streets after his relatives. Mahmood had heard a rumour that the world’s first million-pound cheque was signed at the Coal Exchange. Even now, in the morning, a different calibre of men come bowler-hatted to work at the Mercantile Marine Office or the Custom House. At both the Marine Office and Seaman’s Union you know which door to use if you don’t want trouble, and this goes for the labouring white men as well as black. Beyond the financial district, the neighbourhood is for everyone, all of them hemmed in and pushed close by the railway tracks and canals cutting them off from the rest of Cardiff. A maze of short bridges, canal locks and tramlines confuse the new visitor; just before his time, Somali sailors would wear the address of their lodging house on a board around their neck so that passers-by could help navigate them. The canals are a playground to young children and once, when two went missing, Mahmood had spent a blue, insomniac night searching the muddy water for any sight of them. They had been found in the morning—one white, one black, both drowned. But his boys are still too young to go wandering, alhamdulillah. One day, when they are older, he will show them around this port town with its Norwegian Church and kosher abattoir, its cranes, booms and smoking chimneys, its timber ponds, creosote works and cattle yards, its three broad thoroughfares—Bute Street, James Street, Stuart Street—crisscrossed with ever-narrowing terraces. The flags and funnels of the world’s shipping fleets crowding the pierheads and sprawling across the dock basins.

Mahmood silently plans the future but now, defeated by the icy chill sneaking itself through the gaps between his coat buttons, he decides against another night of poker and heads home to Adamsdown, where the real fire in his life burns.

Violet collapses heavily into the wooden chair and waits for Diana to set the table. “Where’s Gracie?”

“Just finishing up her extra schoolwork, she’ll be down in a minute.”

“I think she’s working too hard, Di, her little face looks haggard.”

“Don’t be ridiculous. She is barely putting pen to paper, spent most of the evening going through my high heels and jazz records. I went up to chivvy her along and her face was smeared in Max Factor Sunset Shine. She thinks she’s set for Hollywood, that one.”

“The cleaner said that when she was changing her bed sheets she found a photo of Ben in his flight suit under her pillow.”

“I know.” Her smile stiffens and she turns her back to Violet.

Violet squeezes Diana’s forearm. “Strength, Sister. Koyekh.”

“Come on down, Grace, we’re waiting for you!” Diana shouts up the stairs, ripping her apron off and folding it over the back of her chair. The pounds she put on over the Christmas holiday still show on her muscular body and her green wiggle dress strains across the back. Her black hair folds into loose waves over her shoulders; she needs a haircut but Violet likes it like this, it gives her sister a Mediterranean look.

“You are a perpetual motion machine.”

“Not by choice, I tell you. Maggie got Daniel to drop off the chicken as I had so many customers earlier. Every last one of them wanted to put his money on a horse with some kind of association with the King: ‘His Majesty,’ ‘Balmoral,’ ‘Buckingham Palace.’ I don’t know if it’s their way of paying their respects or just superstition but I’ve never seen anything like it.”

“I saw one of them cash his advance note of pay with me and then go through to you. A fool and his money.”

“Oh, that’s poor Tahir, he’s not right in the head. One of the sailors told me that he was ‘misused,’ as they say, by Italian soldiers in Africa. He tells me he’s the King of Somalia and killed thousands of men in the war.”

“Which horse did he put money on?”

“The Empress of India,” Diana says, splitting her red-lipped mouth with a loud laugh. “I suppose he thinks that’s his wife.”

“Goodness gracious. Let me go wash my hands quickly.” Violet smiles, looking over the spread on the table: roast chicken, pickled gherkins, boiled potatoes, carrots with red onion and beetroot, and a pile of poppyseed bialys. She returns from the sink and slips her stockinged feet out of her black orthopedic tie-ups, stretching her serpentine spine, scoliosis having made a puzzle out of her ribcage and shoulder blades. She is paler than both Diana and Maggie, her face their father’s down to the deep furrows on either side of her mouth, a nun-like purity to both her dress and to her pink-cheeked face. Her hair is still dark, but the promise of a white widow’s peak suggests itself above her sparse eyebrows. She gives the impression of someone who has always looked older than her real age and is now at the point of inhabiting a body tailored to her: the modest Cardiff shopkeeper.

“Turn on the wireless, Di, I want to hear the rest of the news. Imagine Princess Elizabeth—sorry, Queen Elizabeth—getting the liner back, knowing she has to give up her calm little life with her husband and babies to take the throne.”

“No one is making her. She can stay in Kenya and declare the end of the monarchy for all I care.”

“You have no sense of duty. How could she do that when a whole country, a whole empire, is waiting for her?”

“You would say that, you daddy’s girl. You make me laugh, Violet, Da leaves you this shop and you take it as seriously as if he had left you the entire world. I can imagine your face in the papers today, talking about your solemn pledge to rule 203 Bute Street to the best of your power, with the help of Almighty God.”

“This shop is my life, and if I had just sold it in ’48 what good would that have done? A widow, a spinster, and a little girl, jumping from home to home and job to job.”

“We could have gone to London or New York.”

“To start again? No, Diana, you’re still young enough to get married and have more children. I couldn’t.”

“Of course you could. Maybe not the kids, but you could certainly get married.”

“Should I go rooting through the rascals and charlatans who would only want me for my business?”

“Fine, fine. Your choice.” Diana raises her hands in surrender and then hollers at the top of her voice, “Grace! Get down here this instant.”

“Coming!”

“Just come! Aunty Violet is tired, and the food is getting cold and slimy.”

Thuds pound down the winding staircase and then there she is—the centre of both of their worlds—four feet five of undiluted hope and promise.

She kisses Diana and Violet on their cheeks and then wriggles into her chair. Grace’s soft round face is changing shape, Ben’s square jaw pushing itself out and her nose taking on a fine Volacki curve. Ten summers, ten winters without him, thinks Diana, casting a glance over her daughter’s freckled face.

“Did you get any of your exam practice done, petal?” Violet asks her, cutting into the chicken and putting three slices on to Grace’s plate.

Grace takes a big bite from a bialy and smiles mischievously. “Well, Aunty, I did start to, but then . . .”

“Hmm?” Diana rolls her eyes. “My make-up bag proved more interesting?”

“You shouldn’t have left it out, Mam, you know how easily distracted I am.”

“You’re a cheeky one, Gracie,” laughs Violet.

The wireless announcer forms a fourth companion at the table; a rich male voice from London that sounds clothed in tails and a white bow tie and dress shoes from Bond Street. The tinkle of their knives and forks merges with sonorous choral music and the clang of bells ringing, from Big Ben to a medieval kirk at the furthest reaches of the Hebrides. The land beyond their dining room is in mourning, the stars frozen in their stations, the moon shrouded in black.
  • WINNER | 2022
    Historical Writers' Association Non-Fiction Crown Award
  • LONGLIST | 2022
    Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction
  • SHORTLIST | 2021
    Booker Prize
  • SHORTLIST | 2021
    Costa Novel Award
© Sean and Seng
NADIFA MOHAMED was born in 1981 in Hargeisa, Somaliland. At the age of four she moved with her family to London. She is the author of Black Mamba Boy and The Orchard of Lost Souls. She has received both The Betty Trask Award and the Somerset Maugham Award, and in 2013, she was named as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. Her work appears regularly in The Guardian and the BBC. A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, she lives in London. View titles by Nadifa Mohamed

Nadifa Mohamed, author of The Fortune Men, with John Freeman, Executive Editor at Alfred A. Knopf

Educator Guide for The Fortune Men

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About

In Cardiff, Wales in 1952, Mahmood Mattan, a young Somali sailor, is accused of a crime he did not commit: the brutal killing of Violet Volacki, a shopkeeper from Tiger Bay. At first, Mahmood believes he can ignore the fingers pointing his way; he may be a gambler and a petty thief, but he is no murderer. He is a father of three, secure in his innocence and his belief in British justice.

But as the trial draws closer, his prospect for freedom dwindles. Now, Mahmood must stage a terrifying fight for his life, with all the chips stacked against him: a shoddy investigation, an inhumane legal system, and, most evidently, pervasive and deep-rooted racism at every step.

Under the shadow of the hangman’s noose, Mahmood begins to realize that even the truth may not be enough to save him. A haunting tale of miscarried justice, this book offers a chilling look at the dark corners of our humanity.

BOOKER PRIZE FINALIST
A COSTA BOOK AWARD NOMINEE
ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR

“Nadifa Mohamed’s The Fortune Men is a blues song cut straight from the heart. It tells about the unjust death of an innocent Black man caught up in a corrupt system. Nadifa’s masterful evocation of the full life of Mahmood Mattan, the last man executed in Cardiff for a crime he was exonerated for forty years later, is brought alive with subtle artistry and heartbreaking humanity. In one man’s life Mohamed captures the multitudes of homelands, dialects, hopes, and prayers of Somalis, Jews, Maltese and West Indians drawn in by the ships that filled Wales’ Tiger Bay in the 1950’s, all hoping for a future that eludes Mattan.” —Walter Mosley, author of Devil in a Blue Dress

“A potent, pointed novel. . . . Mohamed is a big talent, and she’s only getting started.” —Dwight Garner, The New York Times

“Equally informative and moving. . . . The immediate allure of the novel is the vibrancy of Mohamed’s prose, her ability to capture the complicated culture of Cardiff and the sound of tortured optimism. . . . The horrific finale of The Fortune Men is never in doubt, but for more than 200 pages Mohamed still creates a sharp sense of suspense by pulling us right into Mahmood’s world as his life tilts and then crashes. . . . There’s a natural grandeur to her portrayal of this ordinary man caught in the city’s gears. Readers will hear echoes of Dostoevsky and Kafka in her re-creation of this nightmare. . . . With The Fortune Men, Mohamed has given us a clear vision of so many victims caught in the maw of racist legal systems.” —Ron Charles, The Washington Post

“Brilliantly depicts the complexities of community within the Black diaspora . . . Mohamed balances colonial history and violence with the evocative interior lives of Mahmood and Violet Volacki. . . . After Mahmood’s arrest, the novel shifts its focus to the British criminal justice system, providing a visceral account of the protagonist’s carceral experience. . . . Mohamed manages such tender detail even while zooming out on the British prison and court systems more broadly.” —Nicole R. Fleetwood, The New York Times

“Searing. . . . Mohamed maintains a high level of tension as the tragedy slowly unfolds. . . . This is a powerful portrayal of an innocent man trapped by a racist system that will resonate with readers familiar with such travesties of justice in the U.S.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“[The Fortune Men] poignantly imagines Mattan’s trial and his time in jail, as his hopes of freedom dwindle. Mohamed underscores Mattan’s confidence in his good character—his belief that ‘the truth kill the lie’—while also showing how, ‘as each witness takes the stand, his previous estimation of his own power diminishes.’” —The New Yorker

“Searing, affecting and distressingly relevant. . . . The Fortune Men, which was shortlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize, manages an intimate presentation of Mattan’s experience. . . . In fictionalizing this story of a lethal miscarriage of justice, Somali-born British writer Nadifa Mohamed has crafted a mesmerizing novel that, notwithstanding its historical setting, has disconcerting resonance for the present.” —Steven W. Beattie, The Toronto Star

“The writing carries a depth of humanity that puts the reader right in the shoes of the characters — the clothes they wear, the streets they walk, the emotions they feel. . . . [The Fortune Men] is filled with the hope of how things should be and the truth of how things are. All of it, the life of Mahmood Mattan, the system convicting him of this murder, and the community that allows it, all brought painfully into focus with Mohamed’s unflinching and gifted prose.” —Urban Waite, San Francisco Chronicle

“[The Fortune Men] was shortlisted for the Booker Prize this year, and it’s not hard to see why: It’s a riveting tale in which Mohamed brings to life a 1950s port city and the injustice that occurred there.” —Wadzanai Mhute, Oprah Daily

“Provocative and evocative. . . . A memorable portrait. . . . [The Fortune Men] is an intimate look at a man whose pride is seen as defiance and whose refusal to be demeaned proves dangerous to a Black man and a foreigner. . . . Mohamed vividly draws the brawling and diverse tough-luck world of the Cardiff docks.” —Stuart Miller, Boston Globe

“Great literary deftness. . . . Mohamed never overdoes things, nor does she reduce any character to stereotype. . . . The Fortune Men gives us richly satisfying insight into the life of the victim himself. . . . Balancing the slow horror of the legal process and the indifference (at best) of the ‘system’ to Mahmood’s plight, Mohamed gives us a wonderfully subtle portrait of Mahmood’s Welsh family.” —Simon Lewis, The Post and Courier

“Compelling. . . . [Mohamed’s] work recovers the intimate lives of men and women caught up in the tumult of history.” —CBC Radio

“Riveting. . . . Memorable. . . . The Fortune Men is a sweeping indictment of British jurisprudence and the many forms prejudice can take. . . . Most poignant of all is the portrait of Mahmood, a proud Muslim who retains his hope and humanity even in the face of the most brutal of injustices.” —Michael Magras, Shelf Awareness

The Fortune Men is that rare novel that breaks your heart and, in so doing, gives you life. Nadifa Mohamed is a revelationshe writes with the fierce compassionate lightning of a truth-teller, lays bare the ghastly colonial condition that afflicts so many of us, where truth cannot overcome injustice. If a novel can be an avenger then The Fortune Men is the one we've all been waiting for.” —Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

“Heart-wrenching. . . . This powerful, deeply affecting exploration of mid-twentieth-century racism and other forms of prejudice has stark relevance today.” —Booklist

“A novel on fire, a restitution of justice in prose. . . . The Fortune Men can be read as a comment on 21st-century Britain and its continued troubled legacy of empire, but also as a beautifully judged fiction in its own right—teeming with life, character and humour, and, particularly, evocative of place.” —Catherine Taylor, Financial Times

“Nadifa Mohamed’s The Fortune Men . . . is an elegant portrayal of life in the racial, cultural hub of Cardiff’s Tiger Bay in the early Fifties. Eschewing a simple morality play for complex vivid characters, it centers on the plight of Mahmood Mattan, who finds himself in the shadow of the hangman’s noose for a murder he didn’t commit.” —Gary Younge, The New Statesman, “Books of the year”

“A miraculous feat. . . . [Mohamed] brings magic to her project, achieving in fiction what no historical account could match. . . . In a reversal of the western perspective, Mohamed shows us Britain through the eyes of this outsider, the Black African, the Muslim. It’s an eye-opening angle of vision and an unforgettable one. . . . Mahmood Mattan has been rescued. Given new life, he emerges from the pages of The Fortune Men as a full-blooded literary victim-hero with all the complexity that such a status tends to require.” —Claudia Peck, Star Tribune

“Based on a real-life case from 1952, The Fortune Man is a masterpiece in storytelling. It tells of Mahmood Mattan, a Somali seaman who was wrongfully convicted of the murder of Lily Volpert and was one of the last men to be executed in Wales. Mohamed’s ability to examine the blistering racial injustices of the time is sobering and immense.” —Eva Waite-Taylor, The Independent

“Utterly gripping. . . . Nadifa Mohamed’s fictional account of this real-life miscarriage of justice has quite rightly been longlisted for the Booker Prize. . . . She tackles this largely forgotten story with skill and empathy.” —Alex Peake-Tomkinson, Prospect

“An engrossing and tense story . . . the senses of loss and cruelty are palpable . . . [The Fortune Men is] an intimate personal portrait with a broader message on the mistreatment of migrants.” —Kirkus Reviews

“[The Fortune Men is] unbearably wrenching, as racism, inept policing and the lure of a cash reward from the victim’s family combine to corner the father-of-three in a monstrous web of injustice. . . . Mohamed makes the outrage at the book’s heart blazingly unignorable by inhabiting Mattan’s point of view, a bold endeavour pulled off to powerful effect.” —Anthony Cummins, Daily Mail U.K.

The Fortune Men . . . confirms [Mohamed] as a literary star of her generation. . . . When Mohamed’s prose—simple and full of soul—illuminates him, Mahmood emerges as a beacon of humour, hope and endurance.” —Ashish Ghadiali, The Observer

“A writer of great humanity and intelligence. Nadifa Mohamed deeply understands how lives are shaped both by the grand sweep of history and the intimate encounters of human beings.” —Kamila Shamsie, author of Home Fire
 
“The Fortune Men describes how innocence is forced to justify itself before gross injustice. A novel of tremendous power, compassion and subtlety, it feels unsettlingly timely.” —Pankaj Mishra, author of Age of Anger
 
“Nadifa Mohamed just gets better and better. Long regarded as one of our most promising young novelists, she has fully arrived with The Fortune Men. Chilling and utterly compelling, it shines an essential light on a much-neglected period of our national life.” —Sathnam Sanghera, author of EmpireLand: How Modern Britain is Shaped by its Imperial Past

Excerpt

Kow

[ One ]

Tiger Bay, February 1952

The King is dead. Long live the Queen.” The announcer’s voice crackles from the wireless and winds around the rapt patrons of Berlin’s Milk Bar as sinuously as the fog curls around the mournful street lamps, their wan glow barely illuminating the cobblestones.

The noise settles as milkshakes and colas clink against Irish coffees, and chairs scrape against the black-and-white tiled floor.

Berlin hammers a spoon against the bar and calls out with his lion tamer’s bark, “Raise your glasses, ladies and gentlemen, and send off our old King to Davy Jones’s Locker.”

“He’ll meet many of our men down there,” replies Old Ismail, “he better write his apologies on the way down.”

“I b-b-b-et he wr-wr-wr-ote them on his d-d-d-eathbed,” a punter cackles.

Through the rock ’n’ roll and spitting espresso machine Berlin hears someone calling his name. “Maxa tiri  ? ” he asks as Mahmood Mattan pushes through the crowd at the bar.

“I said, get me another coffee.”

Berlin catches his Trinidadian wife’s waist and steers her towards Mahmood. “Lou, sort this troublemaker another coffee.”

Ranged along the bar are many of Tiger Bay’s Somali sailors; they look somewhere between gangsters and dandies in their cravats, pocket chains and trilby hats. Only Mahmood wears a homburg pulled down low over his gaunt face and sad eyes. He is a quiet man, always appearing and disappearing silently, at the fringes of the sailors or the gamblers or the thieves. Men pull their possessions closer when he is around and keep their eyes on his long, elegant fingers, but Tahir Gass—who was only recently released from Whit church asylum—leans close to him, looking for friendship that Mahmood won’t give. Tahir is on a road no one can or will walk down with him, his limbs spasming from invisible electric shocks, his face a cinema screen of wild expressions.

“Independence any day now.” Ismail gulps from his mug and smiles. “India is gone, what can they say to the rest?”

Berlin makes his eyes bold. “They say we got you by the balls, darkie! We own your land, your trains, your rivers, your schools, the coffee grains at the bottom of your cup. You see what they do to the Mau Mau and all the Kikuyu in Kenya? Lock them up, man and child.”

Mahmood takes his espresso from Lou and smirks at the exchange; he cares nothing for politics. While trying to straighten his cufflinks a drop of coffee runs over the rim and falls on to his brightly polished shoes. Grabbing a handkerchief from his trouser pocket, he wipes it off and buffs the stain away. The brogues are new and as black and sharp as Newfoundland coal, better shoes than any other fella here has on his feet. Three £1 notes burn away in his pocket, ready for a poker game; saved through missed lunches and nights spent without the fire, mummified in his blankets. Leaning over the bar, he nudges Ismail. “Billa Khan coming tonight?”

“Me come from the jungle? I wish I come from the jungle! I said to him, look around you, this is the jungle, you got bushes and trees everywhere, in my country nothing grows.” Ismail finishes his joke and then turns to Mahmood. “How would I know? Ask one of your crooks.”

Kissing his teeth, Mahmood throws the espresso down his throat and grabs his fawn mackintosh before stalking through the crowd and out of the door.

The cold air hits his face like a spade, and despite urgently forcing the jacket around his body the bitter February night takes hold of him and makes his teeth chatter. A grey smudge hovers over everything he sees, the result of a hot chink of coal flying from a furnace and into his right eye. A pain so pure that it had hoisted him up and backwards on to the cooling clinkers behind his feet. The clatter of shovels and devil’s picks as the other stokers came to his aid, their hands tearing his fingers from his face. His tears had distorted their familiar faces, their eyes the only bright spots in the gloomy engine room, the emergency alarm clattering as the chief engineer’s boots marched down the steel staircase. Afterwards, two weeks in a hospital in Hamburg with a fat bandage wrapped around his head.

That smudge and a bad back are the only physical remnants of his sea life. He hasn’t boarded a ship for near to three years; just foundry work and poky little boilers in prisons and hospitals. The sea still calls, though, just as loudly as the gulls surfing the sky above him, but there is Laura and the boys to anchor him here. Boys who look Somali despite their mother’s Welsh blood, who cling to his legs calling “Daddy, Daddy, Daddy” and pull his head down, mussing up his pomaded hair for forceful kisses that leave his cheeks smelling of sherbet and milk.

The streets are quiet but the news of the King’s death drifts from many of the low-slung wind-blown terraces he passes. Each wireless set relaying the broadcast discordantly, either a second ahead or delayed. Passing the shops on Bute Street, he finds a few lights still on: at Zussen’s pawnbroker’s where many of his clothes are on hock, at the Cypriot barbershop where he has his hair trimmed and at Volacki’s where he used to buy seafaring kits but now just bags the occasional dress for Laura. The tall grand windows of Cory’s Rest are steamed up, with figures laughing and dancing behind the leaded glass. He peeks his head through the door to check if some of his regulars are there, but the West Indian faces around the snooker table are unfamiliar. He had once belonged to this army of workers pulled in from all over the world, dredged in to replace the thousands of mariners lost in the war: dockers, tallymen, kickers, stevedores, winch men, hatch men, samplers, grain porters, timber porters, tackle men, yard masters, teamers, dock watchmen, needle men, ferrymen, shunters, pilots, tugboat men, foyboatmen, freshwater men, blacksmiths, jetty clerks, warehousemen, measurers, weighers, dredgermen, lumpers, launch men, lightermen, crane drivers, coal trimmers, and his own battalion, the stokers.

Mahmood turns away from the wreathed and porticoed splendour of Cory’s Rest towards the docks, from where a red mist tints the raw, uncooked sky. He enjoys watching the nightly, industrial spectacle: the dirty seawater appearing to catch fire as vats of rippled, white-hot furnace slag from the East Moors Steelworks tip into the lapping evening tide. The railway on the foreshore bank clanking and screeching as carts shoot back and forth between the billowing steelwork chimneys and the angry, steaming sea. It’s an eerie and bewitching sight that catches his breath every time; he half expects an island or volcano to spit out from that bubbling, hissing stretch of petrol-streaked water, but it always cools and returns to its morose, dark uniformity by morning.

The docks and Butetown cover only a square mile but for him and his neighbors it’s a metropolis. Raised up from marshland the century before, a Scottish aristocrat built the docks and named the streets after his relatives. Mahmood had heard a rumour that the world’s first million-pound cheque was signed at the Coal Exchange. Even now, in the morning, a different calibre of men come bowler-hatted to work at the Mercantile Marine Office or the Custom House. At both the Marine Office and Seaman’s Union you know which door to use if you don’t want trouble, and this goes for the labouring white men as well as black. Beyond the financial district, the neighbourhood is for everyone, all of them hemmed in and pushed close by the railway tracks and canals cutting them off from the rest of Cardiff. A maze of short bridges, canal locks and tramlines confuse the new visitor; just before his time, Somali sailors would wear the address of their lodging house on a board around their neck so that passers-by could help navigate them. The canals are a playground to young children and once, when two went missing, Mahmood had spent a blue, insomniac night searching the muddy water for any sight of them. They had been found in the morning—one white, one black, both drowned. But his boys are still too young to go wandering, alhamdulillah. One day, when they are older, he will show them around this port town with its Norwegian Church and kosher abattoir, its cranes, booms and smoking chimneys, its timber ponds, creosote works and cattle yards, its three broad thoroughfares—Bute Street, James Street, Stuart Street—crisscrossed with ever-narrowing terraces. The flags and funnels of the world’s shipping fleets crowding the pierheads and sprawling across the dock basins.

Mahmood silently plans the future but now, defeated by the icy chill sneaking itself through the gaps between his coat buttons, he decides against another night of poker and heads home to Adamsdown, where the real fire in his life burns.

Violet collapses heavily into the wooden chair and waits for Diana to set the table. “Where’s Gracie?”

“Just finishing up her extra schoolwork, she’ll be down in a minute.”

“I think she’s working too hard, Di, her little face looks haggard.”

“Don’t be ridiculous. She is barely putting pen to paper, spent most of the evening going through my high heels and jazz records. I went up to chivvy her along and her face was smeared in Max Factor Sunset Shine. She thinks she’s set for Hollywood, that one.”

“The cleaner said that when she was changing her bed sheets she found a photo of Ben in his flight suit under her pillow.”

“I know.” Her smile stiffens and she turns her back to Violet.

Violet squeezes Diana’s forearm. “Strength, Sister. Koyekh.”

“Come on down, Grace, we’re waiting for you!” Diana shouts up the stairs, ripping her apron off and folding it over the back of her chair. The pounds she put on over the Christmas holiday still show on her muscular body and her green wiggle dress strains across the back. Her black hair folds into loose waves over her shoulders; she needs a haircut but Violet likes it like this, it gives her sister a Mediterranean look.

“You are a perpetual motion machine.”

“Not by choice, I tell you. Maggie got Daniel to drop off the chicken as I had so many customers earlier. Every last one of them wanted to put his money on a horse with some kind of association with the King: ‘His Majesty,’ ‘Balmoral,’ ‘Buckingham Palace.’ I don’t know if it’s their way of paying their respects or just superstition but I’ve never seen anything like it.”

“I saw one of them cash his advance note of pay with me and then go through to you. A fool and his money.”

“Oh, that’s poor Tahir, he’s not right in the head. One of the sailors told me that he was ‘misused,’ as they say, by Italian soldiers in Africa. He tells me he’s the King of Somalia and killed thousands of men in the war.”

“Which horse did he put money on?”

“The Empress of India,” Diana says, splitting her red-lipped mouth with a loud laugh. “I suppose he thinks that’s his wife.”

“Goodness gracious. Let me go wash my hands quickly.” Violet smiles, looking over the spread on the table: roast chicken, pickled gherkins, boiled potatoes, carrots with red onion and beetroot, and a pile of poppyseed bialys. She returns from the sink and slips her stockinged feet out of her black orthopedic tie-ups, stretching her serpentine spine, scoliosis having made a puzzle out of her ribcage and shoulder blades. She is paler than both Diana and Maggie, her face their father’s down to the deep furrows on either side of her mouth, a nun-like purity to both her dress and to her pink-cheeked face. Her hair is still dark, but the promise of a white widow’s peak suggests itself above her sparse eyebrows. She gives the impression of someone who has always looked older than her real age and is now at the point of inhabiting a body tailored to her: the modest Cardiff shopkeeper.

“Turn on the wireless, Di, I want to hear the rest of the news. Imagine Princess Elizabeth—sorry, Queen Elizabeth—getting the liner back, knowing she has to give up her calm little life with her husband and babies to take the throne.”

“No one is making her. She can stay in Kenya and declare the end of the monarchy for all I care.”

“You have no sense of duty. How could she do that when a whole country, a whole empire, is waiting for her?”

“You would say that, you daddy’s girl. You make me laugh, Violet, Da leaves you this shop and you take it as seriously as if he had left you the entire world. I can imagine your face in the papers today, talking about your solemn pledge to rule 203 Bute Street to the best of your power, with the help of Almighty God.”

“This shop is my life, and if I had just sold it in ’48 what good would that have done? A widow, a spinster, and a little girl, jumping from home to home and job to job.”

“We could have gone to London or New York.”

“To start again? No, Diana, you’re still young enough to get married and have more children. I couldn’t.”

“Of course you could. Maybe not the kids, but you could certainly get married.”

“Should I go rooting through the rascals and charlatans who would only want me for my business?”

“Fine, fine. Your choice.” Diana raises her hands in surrender and then hollers at the top of her voice, “Grace! Get down here this instant.”

“Coming!”

“Just come! Aunty Violet is tired, and the food is getting cold and slimy.”

Thuds pound down the winding staircase and then there she is—the centre of both of their worlds—four feet five of undiluted hope and promise.

She kisses Diana and Violet on their cheeks and then wriggles into her chair. Grace’s soft round face is changing shape, Ben’s square jaw pushing itself out and her nose taking on a fine Volacki curve. Ten summers, ten winters without him, thinks Diana, casting a glance over her daughter’s freckled face.

“Did you get any of your exam practice done, petal?” Violet asks her, cutting into the chicken and putting three slices on to Grace’s plate.

Grace takes a big bite from a bialy and smiles mischievously. “Well, Aunty, I did start to, but then . . .”

“Hmm?” Diana rolls her eyes. “My make-up bag proved more interesting?”

“You shouldn’t have left it out, Mam, you know how easily distracted I am.”

“You’re a cheeky one, Gracie,” laughs Violet.

The wireless announcer forms a fourth companion at the table; a rich male voice from London that sounds clothed in tails and a white bow tie and dress shoes from Bond Street. The tinkle of their knives and forks merges with sonorous choral music and the clang of bells ringing, from Big Ben to a medieval kirk at the furthest reaches of the Hebrides. The land beyond their dining room is in mourning, the stars frozen in their stations, the moon shrouded in black.

Awards

  • WINNER | 2022
    Historical Writers' Association Non-Fiction Crown Award
  • LONGLIST | 2022
    Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction
  • SHORTLIST | 2021
    Booker Prize
  • SHORTLIST | 2021
    Costa Novel Award

Author

© Sean and Seng
NADIFA MOHAMED was born in 1981 in Hargeisa, Somaliland. At the age of four she moved with her family to London. She is the author of Black Mamba Boy and The Orchard of Lost Souls. She has received both The Betty Trask Award and the Somerset Maugham Award, and in 2013, she was named as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. Her work appears regularly in The Guardian and the BBC. A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, she lives in London. View titles by Nadifa Mohamed

Media

Nadifa Mohamed, author of The Fortune Men, with John Freeman, Executive Editor at Alfred A. Knopf

Guides

Educator Guide for The Fortune Men

Classroom-based guides appropriate for schools and colleges provide pre-reading and classroom activities, discussion questions connected to the curriculum, further reading, and resources.

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Books for Women’s History Month

In honor of Women’s History Month in March, we are sharing books by women who have shaped history and have fought for their communities. Our list includes books about women who fought for racial justice, abortion rights, disability justice, equality in the workplace, and more, with insight on their remarkable lives that inspired others to

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