Uncle Tom's Cabin

Introduction by Darryl Pickney
Afterword by Jonathan Arac
Mass Market Paperback
$5.95 US
On sale Feb 05, 2008 | 544 Pages | 9780451530806
Harriet Beecher Stowe's timeless and moving novel, an incendiary work that fanned the embers of the struggle between free and slave states into the fire of the Civil War.
 
Uncle Tom's Cabin is the story of the slave Tom. Devout and loyal, he is sold and sent down south, where he endures brutal treatment at the hands of the degenerate plantation owner Simon Legree. By exposing the extreme cruelties of slavery, Stowe explores society's failures and asks a profound question: “What is it to be a moral human being?” And as the novel that helped to move a nation to battle, Uncle Tom's Cabin is an essential part of the collective experience of the American people.
 
With an Introduction by Darryl Pinckney
and an Afterword by Jonathan Arac
 
Harriet Beecher Stowe, a prolific writer best remembered today for Uncle Tom's Cabin, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, on June 14, 1811, into a prominent New England family. First serialized in The National Era, an abolitionist paper, in 40 weekly installments between June 5, 1851, and April 1, 1852, and published as a book on March 20, 1852, Uncle Tom's Cabin was an enormous success. Tolstoy deemed it a great work of literature "flowing from love of God and man," and within a year the book had sold more than 300,000 copies. When Abraham Lincoln met her at the White House in 1862, he allegedly remarked: "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war!" She died in Hartford, Connecticut, on July 1, 1896. Perhaps Mrs. Stowe's achievement was best summed up by abolitionist Frederick Douglass who said: "Hers was the word for the hour." View titles by Harriet Beecher Stowe

About

Harriet Beecher Stowe's timeless and moving novel, an incendiary work that fanned the embers of the struggle between free and slave states into the fire of the Civil War.
 
Uncle Tom's Cabin is the story of the slave Tom. Devout and loyal, he is sold and sent down south, where he endures brutal treatment at the hands of the degenerate plantation owner Simon Legree. By exposing the extreme cruelties of slavery, Stowe explores society's failures and asks a profound question: “What is it to be a moral human being?” And as the novel that helped to move a nation to battle, Uncle Tom's Cabin is an essential part of the collective experience of the American people.
 
With an Introduction by Darryl Pinckney
and an Afterword by Jonathan Arac
 

Author

Harriet Beecher Stowe, a prolific writer best remembered today for Uncle Tom's Cabin, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, on June 14, 1811, into a prominent New England family. First serialized in The National Era, an abolitionist paper, in 40 weekly installments between June 5, 1851, and April 1, 1852, and published as a book on March 20, 1852, Uncle Tom's Cabin was an enormous success. Tolstoy deemed it a great work of literature "flowing from love of God and man," and within a year the book had sold more than 300,000 copies. When Abraham Lincoln met her at the White House in 1862, he allegedly remarked: "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war!" She died in Hartford, Connecticut, on July 1, 1896. Perhaps Mrs. Stowe's achievement was best summed up by abolitionist Frederick Douglass who said: "Hers was the word for the hour." View titles by Harriet Beecher Stowe

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