26 Fairmount Avenue: Books 5-8

Things Will Never Be the Same; I'm Still Scared; Why? The War Years; For the Duration

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On sale Jan 21, 2025 | 4 Hours and 0 Minutes | 979-82-17-06475-5
#5: Things Will Never Be the Same
Tomie has his own diary with a lock and a key—now he can write down all his secrets and no one will be able to read them. All through the year, exciting things happen and Tomie writes about them in his diary. Sledding down the steep hill on his new Junior Flexible Flyer, being a pirate in the dance recital, and starting second grade with real art lessons at last! Then one Sunday morning Tomie's family hears news on the radio that changes everything. Master storyteller Tomie dePaola takes us back to 1941 and lets us experience what life was like growing up in the dePaola household.

#6: I'm Still Scared (The War Years)
First-grader Tomie dePaola experiences uncertainty in the weeks following the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. What are the grown-ups talking quietly about at home and even at school? Why does his class have to go to the spooky furnace room for an air raid drill? Why does the family hang thick black curtains over the windows? Tomie's mother is there to comfort and explain the confusion, and Tomie feels better. But he's still scared.

#7: Why? (The War Years)
World War II is raging in Europe, and young Tomie finds that everyday life has changed in many ways. Sure, there's still New Year's Eve to celebrate, and he still has to face penmanship and arithmetic in second grade—definitely not his strongest subjects. But now he has to wear an extra sweater to school because they're trying to conserve coal for heating. And a shopping trip to Hartford for Easter outfits seems more urgent in the face of looming shortages.

#8: For the Duration (The War Years)
Tomie keeps hearing the phrase, 'For the duration.' Gas is being rationed 'for the duration.' The Fourth of July fireworks will be the last show 'for the duration.' So many things will be different as long as the war goes on, but much of Tomie's life goes on as usual. He's excited about starring in a dance recital, taking the bus around town all by himself, and having his first Communion. But Tomie is also still getting over his cousin's death in the war, and he has to say good-bye to his uncle as he ships off to basic training. And then he has a run-in with some bullies and his brother doesn't even help him out. Luckily, Tomie knows there are a lot of people he can count on for the duration.

Just as he did in I'm Still Scared and Why?—the first two installments of The War Yearsbeloved author Tomie dePaola touchingly illuminates the emotional confusion of a child's life during wartime.

Tomie dePaola was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1934, to a family of Irish and Italian background. His determination to create books for children led to a BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and an MFA from the California College of Arts & Crafts in Oakland, California. 

His particular way with color, line, detail, and design have earned him many of the most prestigious awards in his field, among them a Caldecott Honor Award for Strega Nona, the Smithsonian Medal, the Kerlan Award from the University of Minnesota for his "singular attainment in children's literature," the Catholic Library Association's Regina Medal for his "continued distinguished contribution," and the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion. He was also the 1990 United States nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for illustration, and received the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for lifetime contribution to children's literature in 2011.

DePaola has published almost 200 children's books in 15 different countries over the past 30 years. Among his most well-known titles are the Strega Nona series, 26 Fairmount Avenue, and The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush.

DePaola lives in an interesting house in New Hampshire with his four dogs. His studio is in a large renovated 200-year-old barn.

View titles by Tomie dePaola

About

#5: Things Will Never Be the Same
Tomie has his own diary with a lock and a key—now he can write down all his secrets and no one will be able to read them. All through the year, exciting things happen and Tomie writes about them in his diary. Sledding down the steep hill on his new Junior Flexible Flyer, being a pirate in the dance recital, and starting second grade with real art lessons at last! Then one Sunday morning Tomie's family hears news on the radio that changes everything. Master storyteller Tomie dePaola takes us back to 1941 and lets us experience what life was like growing up in the dePaola household.

#6: I'm Still Scared (The War Years)
First-grader Tomie dePaola experiences uncertainty in the weeks following the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. What are the grown-ups talking quietly about at home and even at school? Why does his class have to go to the spooky furnace room for an air raid drill? Why does the family hang thick black curtains over the windows? Tomie's mother is there to comfort and explain the confusion, and Tomie feels better. But he's still scared.

#7: Why? (The War Years)
World War II is raging in Europe, and young Tomie finds that everyday life has changed in many ways. Sure, there's still New Year's Eve to celebrate, and he still has to face penmanship and arithmetic in second grade—definitely not his strongest subjects. But now he has to wear an extra sweater to school because they're trying to conserve coal for heating. And a shopping trip to Hartford for Easter outfits seems more urgent in the face of looming shortages.

#8: For the Duration (The War Years)
Tomie keeps hearing the phrase, 'For the duration.' Gas is being rationed 'for the duration.' The Fourth of July fireworks will be the last show 'for the duration.' So many things will be different as long as the war goes on, but much of Tomie's life goes on as usual. He's excited about starring in a dance recital, taking the bus around town all by himself, and having his first Communion. But Tomie is also still getting over his cousin's death in the war, and he has to say good-bye to his uncle as he ships off to basic training. And then he has a run-in with some bullies and his brother doesn't even help him out. Luckily, Tomie knows there are a lot of people he can count on for the duration.

Just as he did in I'm Still Scared and Why?—the first two installments of The War Yearsbeloved author Tomie dePaola touchingly illuminates the emotional confusion of a child's life during wartime.

Author

Tomie dePaola was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1934, to a family of Irish and Italian background. His determination to create books for children led to a BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and an MFA from the California College of Arts & Crafts in Oakland, California. 

His particular way with color, line, detail, and design have earned him many of the most prestigious awards in his field, among them a Caldecott Honor Award for Strega Nona, the Smithsonian Medal, the Kerlan Award from the University of Minnesota for his "singular attainment in children's literature," the Catholic Library Association's Regina Medal for his "continued distinguished contribution," and the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion. He was also the 1990 United States nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for illustration, and received the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for lifetime contribution to children's literature in 2011.

DePaola has published almost 200 children's books in 15 different countries over the past 30 years. Among his most well-known titles are the Strega Nona series, 26 Fairmount Avenue, and The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush.

DePaola lives in an interesting house in New Hampshire with his four dogs. His studio is in a large renovated 200-year-old barn.

View titles by Tomie dePaola